The MDS 3.0 V1.16  course instruction is provided by a Registered Nurse licensed in California with over 30 years of experience who has Approval for Director of Staff Development/ Instructor through the State of California Health and Human Services Agency Department of Health Services and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree . Joshua Tree Private School © is "old school" and believes in having a personal connection with  students

What is an MDS?
The Resident Assessment Instrument RAI consists of three basic components: The Minimum Data Set (MDS) Version 3.0, the Care Area Assessment (CAA) process and the RAI Utilization Guidelines. The utilization of the three components of the RAI yields information about a resident’s functional status, strengths, weaknesses, and preferences, as well as offering guidance on further assessment once problems have been identified. Each component flows naturally into the next as follows:
• Minimum Data Set (MDS). A core set of screening, clinical, and functional status elements, including common definitions and coding categories, which forms the foundation of a comprehensive assessment for all residents of nursing homes certified to participate in Medicare or Medicaid. The items in the MDS standardize communication about resident problems and conditions within nursing homes, between nursing homes, and between nursing homes and outside agencies. The required subsets of data items for each MDS assessment and tracking document (e.g., Comprehensive, Quarterly, OBRA Discharge, Entry Tracking, PPS item sets) can be found in Appendix H.
• Care Area Assessment (CAA) Process. This process is designed to assist the assessor to systematically interpret the information recorded on the MDS. Once a care area has been triggered, nursing home providers use current, evidence-based clinical resources to conduct an assessment of the potential problem and determine whether or not to care plan for it. The CAA process helps the clinician to focus on key issues identified during the assessment process so that decisions as to whether and how to intervene can be explored with the resident. The CAA process is explained in detail in Chapter 4. Specific components of the CAA process include:
— Care Area Triggers (CATs) are specific resident responses for one or a combination of MDS elements. The triggers identify residents who have or are at risk for developing specific functional problems and require further assessment.
— Care Area Assessment is the further investigation of triggered areas, to determine if the care area triggers require interventions and care planning. The CAA resources are provided as a courtesy to facilities in Appendix C. These resources include a compilation of checklists and Web links that may be helpful in performing the assessment of a triggered care area. The use of these resources is not mandatory and the list of Web links is neither all-inclusive nor government endorsed.
— CAA Summary (Section V of the MDS 3.0) provides a location for documentation of the care area(s) that have triggered from the MDS and the decisions made during the CAA process regarding whether or not to proceed to care planning.
• Utilization Guidelines. The Utilization Guidelines provide instructions for when and how to use the RAI.

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The MDS course instruction is provided by a Registered Nurse licensed in California with over 30 years of experience who holds a Bachelor of Science Degree . Joshua Tree Private School © is "old school" and believes in having a personal connection with  course participants.  

Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 v1.16 Certificate On Line Course                          
For: RN's and LVN's
Unique Offer: Unique Offer $99 
Call/Text:  (760) 820-9064
Presented by: Joshua Tree Private School

*Provider Approved By the California Board of  Registered Nursing
Provider Number: 15948 for 30 contact hours Free E Book!

Includes Free  Infection Prevention Control (ICP) Specialist for Long Term Care Certificate Course